The Roman World, 44 BC-AD 180

By Martin Goodman; Jane Sherwood | Go to book overview
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The Roman World, 44 BC-AD 180
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • List of Plates xiii
  • List of Figures xv
  • Preface xvii
  • List of Dates xx
  • List of Abbreviations xxii
  • Part I - Introduction 1
  • 1 - Sources and Problems 3
  • 2 - The Roman World in 50bc 10
  • Part II - Élite Politics 19
  • 3 - The Political Language of Rome 21
  • 4 - Caesar to Augustus, 50 Bc-Ad 14 28
  • 5 - Julio-Claudians, Ad 14-68 47
  • 6 - Civil War and Flavians, Ad 68-96 58
  • 7 - Nerva to Marcus Aurelius, Ad 96-180 67
  • Part III - The State 79
  • 8 - Military Autocracy 81
  • 9 - The Operation of the State in Rome 87
  • 10 - The Operation of the State in the Provinces 100
  • 11 - The Army in Society 113
  • 12 - The Image of the Emperor 123
  • 13 - The Extent of Political Unity 135
  • 14 - The Extent of Economic Unity 142
  • 15 - The Extent of Cultural Unity 149
  • Part IV - Society 157
  • 16 - Reactions to Imperial Rule 159
  • 17 - The City of Rome 165
  • 18 - The City of Rome 179
  • 19 - Italy and Sicily 190
  • 20 - The Iberian Peninsula and the Islands of the Western Mediterranean 197
  • 21 - France and Britain 203
  • 22 - The Rhineland and the Balkans 217
  • 23 - Greece and the Aegean Coast 229
  • 24 - Central and Eastern Turkey 237
  • 25 - The Northern Levant and Mesopotamia 242
  • 26 - The Southern Levant 251
  • 27 - Egypt 262
  • 28 - North Africa 276
  • Part V - Humans and Gods 285
  • 29 - Paganism 287
  • 30 - Judaism 302
  • 31 - Christianity 315
  • Notes 331
  • Bibliographical Notes 359
  • Index 367
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