Land, Water, and Development: Sustainable Management of River Basin Systems

By Malcolm Newson | Go to book overview

Chapter 4

Managing land and water in the developed world

An international survey

4.1 DEVELOPMENT AND THE RIVER BASIN

Geographers and politicians argue over definitions of development, over maps of where it has occurred, is occurring and will occur and over rates of development. Perhaps the most commendable classification to emerge in recent years separates off the least developed countries (LDCs). However, virtually all definitions imply some form of ‘cultural colonialism’ by implying that development is a process and pattern laid down immutably by the ‘First World’ (Bissio, 1988). The trade system directed by world capitalism confirms an international homogeneity; in the field of water projects the hegemonies of finance and technology transfer are also forces.

To anyone based in the UK, a small nation on an island, developed for habitation over thousands of years, the two most startling aspects of river basin development are the size of the river basins tackled by both ancient and modern management schemes (consider those shown on Figure 4.1) and the rapidity with which technology transfer is now leading to convergence of schemes. Two important new questions then emerge: Are large schemes good schemes? Does convergent technology negate local variation in environment? These cannot be answered until the end of Chapter 5.

An even more basic question arises as to the precise role of water development in the development process as a whole. As Cox (1988) puts it, ‘much of the history of civilization involves a continuing effort to enhance the positive aspects of the water resource and to control the negative aspects’ (p. 91).

However, Cox goes on to reveal that empirical studies find it difficult to link water development to the location and intensity of private economic activity—water has not been a high priority in industrial or urban location in the developed world (see also Rees, 1969). In the developing world, however, the predominating agricultural or primary industrial economy is much more likely to be boosted by deliberate investment in water. The history of water development in the USA demonstrates that a continuation of government support for ‘cheap water’ after the initial agricultural period leads inevitably to

-99-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Land, Water, and Development: Sustainable Management of River Basin Systems
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Plates ix
  • Figures x
  • Tables xv
  • Preface to the First Edition xix
  • Preface to the Second Edition xxii
  • Acknowledgements xxvi
  • Prologue xxviii
  • Chapter 1 - History of River Basin Management 1
  • Chapter 2 - Natural River Basins 23
  • Chapter 3 - Land and Water 57
  • Chapter 4 - Managing Land and Water in the Developed World 99
  • Chapter 5 - River Basins and Development 151
  • Chapter 6 - Technical Issues in River Basin Management 214
  • Chapter 7 - Institutional Issues in River Basin Management 281
  • Chapter 8 - Sustainable River Basin Management 321
  • Chapter 9 - Land and Water 351
  • Bibliography 374
  • Name Index 408
  • Subject Index 411
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 424

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.