7

Conflict and hunger

Introduction

This topic of this chapter, like Chapter 5, cannot be analysed with reference to one scale. Conflict as experienced in most parts of the world today is caused by factors at the international, national and local levels. It tends to become most serious in places where resources are already stretched, which itself may be part of the causation, and inevitably its consequences mean a reduction in these already inadequate resources. Its impacts are also experienced, in different ways, at all levels and of course at the household level too. Its impact is also differentiated by gender, age, ethnicity and religion in most cases. Unfortunately, the implications of conflict for food security remain very serious: it is particularly implicated in the creation of famine circumstances. Analysis of entitlements, broadly conceived, around which this text is built, makes the examination of conflict unavoidable; conflict erodes, destroys, despoils and transforms the entitlement patterns of all those caught in its scope.

The old battlefields of the Third World, where the proxy wars of the United States and USSR were played out, are still bloodied by conflict in countries such as Afghanistan and Angola. In other countries, new waves of violence are accompanying the birth of a post-Cold War (dis)order.

(Macrae and Zwi, 1994, 1)

Today (23 July 1996), Burundi and Rwanda are in the news again and the international community holds its breath and hopes that more massacres will be avoided - holds its breath because it appears incapable and/or unwilling to do anything more constructive. This situation, in East Africa, is just one example of what is referred to in academic, political and policy circles as a ‘complex emergency’. These precipitate humanitarian crises and are multicausal but always associated with armed conflict. The number of complex emergencies is increasing and they are intimately and inevitably associated with food crises of varying types and intensity. The term ‘food wars’ (Messer, 1994) is applied to many of these conflicts and reflects the centrality of food to their dynamics. Although they occur most frequently and disastrously across the South, since 1989 they have occurred in the area of the former Soviet Union and with devastating humanitarian consequences in the former Yugoslavia. However, their gravest direct and indirect impact is in sub-Saharan Africa. Measuring the number of deaths due to conflict is problematic, but Green holds that in sub-Saharan Africa since 1980 ‘much below eight million would be unrealistic’ (Green, 1994, 37).

-133-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
World Hunger
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Plates ix
  • Figures xi
  • Tables xiii
  • Acknowledgements xiv
  • 1 - A Framework for Analysis and Historical Overview 2
  • 2 - The Contemporary Nature and Extent of Hunger 17
  • 3 - International Perspectives on Global Hunger 36
  • 4 - National Perspectives 64
  • 5 - Gendered Fields 88
  • 6 - Sub-National Perspectives 111
  • 7 - Conflict and Hunger 133
  • 8 - Alternative Futures 147
  • Index 177
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 186

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.