From Feasting to Fasting, the Evolution of a Sin: Attitudes to Food in Late Antiquity

By Veronika E. Grimm | Go to book overview

5

CLEMENT OF ALEXANDRIA

As the imminence of the Second Coming, together with the ‘end of the present world’, receded into the unforeseeable future, Christian communities were left with an ever-greater need for detailed exposition of moral and ethical conduct that would suit their members in daily life. No writer gave this problem more painstaking attention than Clement of Alexandria. Among his surviving works there is a large treatise called Paidagogos, which may be seen as the first book of etiquette written for Christians. This book, as well as the rest of his extant works, are testimony to their author’s deep commitment to the education of Christians. This, he thought, should commence with mastering the very basic skills, like how to wash behind the ears; then proceed to proper training in understanding of Scripture, and finally should even extend to the study of philosophy. Eager to take on the task of the educator, Clement comments extensively on all aspects of Christian conduct in his surviving works, which pay special attention to food, drink, and table manners; alongside these he gives instructions concerning exercise, bathing, clothing and marital intercourse.

In what follows I shall examine Clement’s views concerning food and fasting in his two massive works, the Paidagogos and the Stromateis, and try to assess the experiences and some of the likely intellectual influences which may have helped to shape these, and also what they may reveal concerning the life and social milieu of the audience he was addressing.


THE AUTHOR

These tasks are made difficult by the same dearth of information concerning the author as faced us in the previous chapters. Nothing is known about Clement’s life, save what may be surmised from his own

-90-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
From Feasting to Fasting, the Evolution of a Sin: Attitudes to Food in Late Antiquity
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Abbreviations ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - The Jewish Background 14
  • 2 - The Graeco-Roman Background 34
  • 3 - Food and Fasting in the Pauline Epistles 60
  • 4 - Food and Fasting in the Acts of the Apostles 74
  • 5 - Clement of Alexandria 90
  • 6 - Food and Fasting in the Works of Tertullian 114
  • 7 - Food and Fasting in Origen and Eusebius 140
  • 8 - Jerome and Ascetic Propaganda 157
  • 9 - Augustine and Ascetic Practice 180
  • Conclusion 191
  • Notes 198
  • Bibliography 267
  • Index 278
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 294

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.