Women and the Israeli Occupation: The Politics of Change

By Tamar Mayer | Go to book overview

5

ISRAELI WOMEN AGAINST THE OCCUPATION

Political growth and the persistence of ideology 1

Yvonne Deutsch

(translated by Andre Rosenthal)

By peace we mean the absence of violence in any given society, both internal and external, direct and indirect. We further mean the nonviolent results of equality of rights, by which every member of the society, through nonviolent means, participates equally in decisional power which regulates it, and the distribution of the resources which sustain it.

(Brock-Utne 1985:2)

The Palestinian intifada, which began in December 1987, the 21st year of the Israeli occupation of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip, has promoted the political involvement of women in Israel against the Occupation. Close to a month after the beginning of the intifada, non-Zionist, radical, Jewish women in Israel began demonstrating in support of the Palestinian struggle against the Occupation, and eventually they succeeded in creating the political tools to involve together both radicals and women from the political center. Gradually more and more women, both Jewish and Palestinian, from Israel joined protest and solidarity activities, including meetings with Palestinian women from the Occupied Territories. Up until the crisis in the Gulf in August 1990 the women’s peace movement was steadily developing in Israel—simultaneously mounting significant and widespread opposition to the Occupation and, at the same time, attempting to create an alternative political culture as the basis for radical change in the basic priorities of Israeli society.

The 1990 Gulf crisis and war constituted a turning point which brought a drastic drop in the scope of women’s activities against the Occupation and in support of peace. Moreover, the new government of Israel, elected in June 1992, in which the liberal factions of the peace movement became part of the ruling Labor establishment, together with the political process shaped by the

-88-

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Women and the Israeli Occupation: The Politics of Change
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Tables ix
  • Acknowledgments xii
  • 1 - Women and the Israeli Occupation 1
  • 3 - Between National and Social Liberation 33
  • 4 - Heightened Palestinian Nationalism 62
  • 5 - Israeli Women Against the Occupation 88
  • 6 - Palestinian Women in Israel 106
  • Bibliography 119
  • 7 - Homefront as Battlefield 121
  • 8 138
  • 9 - Women Street Peddlers 147
  • Bibliography 163
  • 10 - Environmental Problems Affecting Palestinian Women Under Occupation 164
  • 11 - A Feminist Politics of Health Care 179
  • Index 199
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