Tips and Tricks for Web Site Managers

By Mark Kerr | Go to book overview

Chapter 1

Site Definition and Planning

Researching the marketing and publishing environment, assessing the competition and planning the web site design process—all these activities are essential if you are to give your web site project the greatest chance of success, at the least cost to you and your organisation.


Planning
Whether the aim is to develop a new web site or improve an existing service, it is increasingly clear that many sites do not always meet their targets. These targets may be revenue based or they may be more abstract, seeking to present the organisation as effectively and efficiently as possible to its audience. The publicly available Web is developing at breathtaking speed. A recent report from Cyveillance (http://www.cyveillance.com) estimated that 7,000,000 new pages are added to the Web each day. The current total size of the public Web is over two billion documents. No matter what the content, purpose or location of your site, at some level you are competing with much of this information for the attention of your existing or anticipated audience. Developing an effective service to achieve your objectives requires a strategy; and an effective strategy requires a plan. There are four basic stages through which the planner has to move to create an effective project plan:
• Awareness
• Familiarity
• Understanding
• Readiness.

‘Research till you drop. When setting up a web site or e-business do as much research as you can to find out who is offering similar services on-line (and off-line). Use search engines, company lists, newsgroups and word of mouth to get as much information on your competitors as you possibly can. And don’t just limit your research to European companies—EVERYONE is a competitor on-line. Most importantly don’t stop researching once your e-company/dotcom is off the ground. Carry on researching and refining. ’

Gillian Roach

Editor, Internet Works magazine


Awareness

Although your site may be designed by other staff, or by an outside contractor, it is essential that you, as the site manager, understand the

-8-

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Tips and Tricks for Web Site Managers
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents iii
  • Acknowledgements iv
  • Introduction 6
  • Chapter 1 - Site Definition and Planning 8
  • Chapter 2 - Information Architecture and Navigation Design 20
  • Chapter 3 - Page Design and Graphics 73
  • Chapter 4 - Site Quality and Accessibility 94
  • Chapter 5 - Web Site Policies and E-Commerce 142
  • Chapter 6 - Marketing and Promotion 146
  • Conclusion 162
  • Appendix 163
  • Bibliography 165
  • Index 166
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