Bourdieu and Education: Acts of Practical Theory

By Michael David James Grenfell | Go to book overview

Chapter 4

Cultural Reproduction: Mothers’ Involvement in Their Children’s Primary Schooling

Diane Reay


Introduction

There is a long history of sociological writing which sees the educational system as being central to the question of the distribution of advantage and disadvantage within society (see for example, Jackson and Marsden, 1962; Willis, 1977; Halsey et al, 1980; Connell et al, 1982; Gewirtz et al., 1995). However, few studies of cultural reproduction have attempted a ‘gendered’ analysis of parental involvement in such a process; in other words, examined the differences between men and women in the way they relate to school in their dealings with it as parent. Even fewer have included ‘race’ within their discussion. This chapter attempts both through a focus on the home-school relationship as a key element to cultural reproduction.

Much recent educational policy in Britain can be interpreted as reconstructing the relationship between home and the primary school; that is breaking down the public/private divide by taking increasing amounts of school work into the home (David, 1993). The rapid growth of workbooks for children to complete in the home and the promotion of supermarket vouchers for parents to collect and exchange for school resources are both examples of this. They offer us an illustration of the increasing commodification of education and the redistribution of responsibility between family and school. During the 1980s and 1990s a new educational agenda developed which offered parents a seemingly powerful role. In public policy discourses parents were increasingly seen as ‘consumers’ empowered in the educational marketplace through their access to choice. Carol Vincent points out: ‘Parents-as-consumers is the mechanism through which disparate elements of Conservative ideology—individualism, freedom, consumer choice, morality, discipline and order—are bound together in the education system’ (Vincent, 1996, p. 40).

It is possible to see parental involvement itself in terms of ‘discourses’, which position mothers as the parent who is either enhancing or holding back children’s educational progress (David et al., 1996; Walkerdine and Lucey, 1989). However, at the same time the changing balance between home and school seems to result in an increased differential in responsibilities between mothers and fathers.

-55-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Bourdieu and Education: Acts of Practical Theory
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 202

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.