James Fenimore Cooper: The Critical Heritage

By George Dekker; John P. Williams | Go to book overview

8.

From an unsigned review, Literary Gazette

ix (March 1825), 149-51

A British view of Cooper’s revolutionary patriotism.

Mr. Cooper, the writer of these novels, is placed by acclamation in a high rank in his country’s literature; and he appears to consider himself to be quite as clever a fellow as the good-natured world gives him credit for being. But this is not very extraordinary in an American, or man of the New World, since it is a very common idea among men of the Old, who ought to know better. But notwithstanding every opinion on the matter, including his own, Mr. Cooper is not equal to the Great Unknown, whom he imitates (at a long distance), and tries to ridicule with marvellous small success.

The present work is connected with a sort of history of the early movements in the American war, and remarkable for being pretty particularly American, considerably Anti-Anglican, and genuine Republican. We have the Battle of Lexington, (heaven help the name!) and the Battle of Bunker’s Hill, and the siege, or leauger forsooth, of Boston, and the immortal patriot Washington, and the oppressive English government, and the bloody British grenadiers, and the glorious plough-boy heroes of Massachussets who beat them, and all the rest of it, shown up as seen by trans-atlantic optics, as truly and clearly as the Sea Serpent itself. But we have also fictitious personages introduced (though Mr. Cooper maketh oath and saith they are only so in name), and are thence instructed that the separation of the colonies from the mother country was effected principally through the agency of a mad old gentleman, called Ralph, (after the Ravens we suppose, for he is a deuce of a croaker, ) and an ideot lad called Job Pray, who ran errands at Boston, and delivereth his oracles in real Bostonian attic, and fires his rifle with real backwood accuracy.

We cannot compliment the American Waverley on these two characters. To find in the end that the supernatural Ralph is only a maniac who has escaped from his keeper, and yet not only sails from

-78-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
James Fenimore Cooper: The Critical Heritage
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 306

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.