George Orwell: The Critical Heritage

By Jeffrey Meyers | Go to book overview

30.

H. J. Laski, Left News

March 1937, pp. 275-6

Harold Laski (1893-1950), Professor of Political Science at the London School of Economics, intellectual spokesman of the Labour Party, co-founder of the Left Book Club. In ‘Politics and the English Language’ Orwell uses Laski to exemplify turgid language and the ‘mental vices from which we now suffer’ (IV, p. 128).

In a sense, I am not quite certain that this note of mine is not really superfluous. Most of what I think about Mr Orwell’s book has been admirably expressed by Gollancz in his Foreword; and the temptation is to let it go at that. But there are, perhaps, certain additional things it is worth while to emphasise, and Mr Orwell’s method of approach is a useful basis upon which to say them.

The first part of his book is, I think, admirable propaganda for our ideas. It takes an ugly section of British life, and it forces us to confront it for the ugly thing that it is. Every social observer knows that what Mr Orwell has here so graphically described is true of large parts of not only industrial Britain, but of rural Britain as well. It explains the dreadful picture of a life void of colour and beauty that Mr Beales and Mr Lambert gave us in their remarkable Memoirs of the Unemployed. It provides a useful background to the account Wal Hannington has recently given us in his very valuable Unemployed Struggles. The men and women who marched behind him with such fortitude and endurance came from just the kind of environment Mr Orwell has made living in all its inherent ugliness.

The value of this part of his work, as I see it, is the kind of value we get from Dickens’ Hard Times, or from the novels of Zola and Balzac. The danger for all of us is, in these matters, that we tend to make of living and suffering men and women a kind of composite picture, which easily becomes a concept fitting into the habitual mental picture of the world we carry about with us. As soon as that occurs, it ceases seriously to worry us in a way that compels action. It rests somewhere

-104-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
George Orwell: The Critical Heritage
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 392

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.