Arthur Hugh Clough: The Critical Heritage

By Michael Thorpe | Go to book overview

by these words from the Rambler (No. 20): ‘Of their poetical merit it is needless to speak, for the quotations we have given will enable readers to judge for themselves. ’) To facilitate reading, shorter quotations of verse, up to ten lines approximately, have been printed entire. Quotations made from Clough’s prose have generally been printed in full, as the prose is likely to be less readily accessible to readers. It seemed undesirable to clutter the text with notes indicating where early critics’ quotations differ in detail from later, revised texts, as, for example, with The Bothie and Amours de Voyage; Poems (1951) provides this service. Where early critics’ quotations from The Bothie differ markedly from those of the corrected version (most of which appeared in Poems, 1862) I have left them as they stand and added notes to facilitate the reader’s comparisons. In the case of Dipsychus I have occasionally supplied notes to indicate where a reference to the version of 1869 may be found in the greatly differing scheme of the modern edition.

In general I have printed only those parts of the comments on Ambarvalia which are concerned with Clough’s contribution to the joint volume, but occasionally I have retained those on Burbidge’s in order to keep the tone and judgments of reviewers in their original perspective (see Nos. 16, 18, 19).

Where the authors of anonymous pieces have been traced, their names have been included in the headnotes of the relevant items. Footnotes have been kept to a minimum: unless otherwise indicated, they are my own. I have supplied translations, where I could, for quotations that may need it, but I have not included tags among these. I have silently corrected obvious printing, spelling or punctuation errors and omitted the page references to early editions which some reviewers supplied.

Each item has been headed with a paragraph supplying a brief ‘placing’ comment on the piece itself and, where it seemed useful, on the critic. The chronological arrangement of items has been determined, first, by the dates of publication of the various collections of Clough’s work; second, for the period after 1869, by the date when the item was first published. Readers who wish to trace the history of comment upon any particular work will find full references in the Index.

MICHAEL THORPE

Leiden/Calgary

-xv-

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