Arthur Hugh Clough: The Critical Heritage

By Michael Thorpe | Go to book overview

moments when he could strongly feel all the nobleness and romance attached to the then falling cause of Italy:—

[Concludes by quoting ‘Peschiera’. ]


29.

[Henry Fothergill Chorley], review of Poems in the Athenaeum

26 July 1862, 107-9

Chorley (1808-72) was a music and literary critic with the Athenaeum, 1833-66, an unsuccessful novelist and dramatist and a close friend and admirer of Browning.

The writer of the biographical notice prefixed to this volume makes little of his hero. Mr. Clough, born a Liverpool man, was, we are reminded, ‘first favourite’ among the remarkable company of youths trained and moulded by the good, genial Arnold at Rugby, and was there considered as a youth of no ordinary promise. Subsequently he won the hearts of all who came near him when a tutor at Oxford, as he had done when a Rugby school-boy, by his manliness, his genius, and his resolution to be and to do everything which is right and honourable. But he was vexed by vain longings, which his biographer shall describe in his own language: —

[Quotes the passage ‘Having held a tutorship in his college’ to ‘or Pascal felt it’ from Palgrave’s ‘Memoir’: see pp. 112-13 above. ]

On leaving Oxford, Mr. Clough travelled and wrote letters home from Paris, in the Carlyle dialect, concerning ‘well-to-do-ism’, ‘vulgar parcel-gilt era, ’ and such matters. He was in Rome during the period when the Eternal City was in the hands of the Mazzini Triumvirate, — sympathized keenly with the daring and disappointment of the Republicans, —and came home ‘from the temporary triumph of shame

-135-

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