Arthur Hugh Clough: The Critical Heritage

By Michael Thorpe | Go to book overview

theories and half-mastered thoughts. Let us part from him in his own words:

[Quotes entire ‘Some future day when what is now is not’. ]


34.

W. Y. Sellar, from a review in North British Review

November 1862, xxxvii, 323-43

William Yonge Sellar (1825-90), classical scholar and Fellow at Oriel, was a friend of both Clough and Arnold. Arnold refers to his first reaction to The Bothie in the letter given as No. I.

It is now nearly a year since the author of this volume of poems died at Florence, in the forty-second year of his age. Much regret for his untimely loss, and admiration of his genius and character, were expressed at the time of his death by friends who had been intimate with him at Rugby, at Oxford, and in later life, and who had other means of estimating his power of mind and purity of character than were accessible to those who only knew him by his writings. To few men, with equal justice, could the pathetic words of the old Roman poet be applied—


Multis ille bonis flebilis occidit.1

There were some, also, who did not know him personally, but had long known him as the author of a few remarkable poems, which seemed to them never to have been adequately appreciated. They will gladly welcome this republication of the best of the old poems, with the addition of others equally powerful, and equally characteristic of their author. But the knowledge of these poems is no longer confined

1 ‘Many a good man may weep for his death’ (Horace, Odes, I, xxiv, 9).

G

-175-

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