John Clare: The Critical Heritage

By Mark Storey | Go to book overview

(e) Clare to Taylor, 6 or 7 March 1821, LJC, p. 103. There had been discussion over what should be included in The Village Minstrel.

…your taste is preferable to any I have witnessd & on that I rely—mines not worth twopence—& a critics is too severe for me—a man of feeling that looks on faults with indulgence & never willfuly passes by a blossom he may chance to find on his journey is a man to my mind & such a one (no flattery mind from me) I reckon John Taylor.

(f) Clare to Taylor, 10 July 1821, LJC, pp. 120-1. Clare had seen the proofs of The Village Minstrel.

You rogue you, the pruning hook has been over me agen I see in the Vols but vain as I am of my abilities I must own your lopping off have bravely amended them the ‘Rural Evening’ & ‘Cress Gatherer’ in particular are now as compleat as anything in the Vols. but the ‘Pastoral’ & ‘death of Dobbin’ are left out to save the public 6d expense—but why do I rant & rattle on at this rate—friend I believe you are a caterer of profound wisdom in these matters you know what sort of a dish will suit the publics appetite better then I at all events you’ll say ‘I ought to do’.


43.

More advice from Eliza Emmerson

1820

(a) Eliza Emmerson to Clare, 10 July 1820, Eg. 2245, fol. 168. Similar advice was given by Taylor on 12 February 1820, ‘I think you will find old Poetry more powerful than the new in stimulating you to fresh Performances—there was so much more truth in the old Poets—they looked and thought for themselves;—but I would not give you any advice on what you should do—you will feel your own way best’ (Eg. 2245, fol. 38). Clare was soon writing pastiches of the older poets, which he sent to newspapers as rediscovered poems by Marvell, Sir

-127-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
John Clare: The Critical Heritage
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 454

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.