John Clare: The Critical Heritage

By Mark Storey | Go to book overview

65.

The Rev. W. Allen on Clare

1823

From Four letters from the Rev. W. Allen, to the Right Hon. Admiral Lord Radstock, on the Poems of John Clare, the Northamptonshire Peasant, 1823.

This was the first, lengthy, independent assessment of Clare’s poetry. Mrs Emmerson (14 March 1823) was ecstatic about it: the promise she had suspected ‘has been fulfill’d, but, in so masterly, so sensible and so liberal & feeling a way—that any thing which I can say in favor of the Critique wd be worthless—so perfect is it, as to poetical taste & refined judgment, in my opinion’ (Eg. 2246, fol. 161v). Taylor was refusing to publish it in the London Magazine, on the grounds that his readers were already aware of Clare. Clare seems to have thought this sensible enough. Mrs Emmerson then announced (6 May 1823) that she and Lord Radstock were going to publish Allen’s work at their own expense; Murray was to print 500 copies (Eg. 2246, fol. 189). She was convinced that the critique would help Clare ‘without the use of flattery’, and a month later it was out (13 June), published by Hatchard and Booth. Not everyone was pleased with it. Mrs Emmerson complained that John Bull’s review was too partial, and Charles Elton, author of The Idler’s Epistle (No. 67) told Clare on 8 September 1824, that ‘the allusions [in the Epistle] to coxcomb patrons was meant for Mr. Allen, who wrote the letters on your poetry: and Rip and I both thought him a blockhead for his pains’ (Eg. 2246, fol. 379v). Rip was the artist E. V. Rippingille (1798?-1859) with whom Clare struck up a lasting friendship. Allen, the incum-bent of Peel, Lancashire, had his sermons published in two volumes in 1835.

-176-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
John Clare: The Critical Heritage
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 454

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.