John Clare: The Critical Heritage

By Mark Storey | Go to book overview

troubled fountain, or the twittering movements of the hopping Goldfinch &c All joined in the Chorus of Praise & rejoiced that our poet was himself again nay more than himself….

9 Dec: I have been reading more of your poems & with every succeeding one am more & more delighted. I can not think it possible that he who could write such admirable things as are contained in this Vol: could have any apprehension, about the reception, they will meet with in the World of Letters, but if doubts do come across you, disregard them for when Men having one Flash of Taste, one Spark of Feeling or one Grain of Sense do not admire the unaffected Narrative of the ‘Progress of Love’, the Simplicity & Nature that runs thro’ the ‘Pastorals’ or the Sublimity of the ‘Dream’ then is Chaos come again. The Publication of these Efforts will choke the vain railings of your envious contemporaries & smother all they have said or dare say. If this Prophecy is not fulfilled then henceforth I shall set myself Down an arrant Fool & in Matters of this Sort will forever hold my Tongue.


78.

Eliza Emmerson on Clare

1826

Eliza Emmerson to Clare, 8 December 1826, Eg. 2247, fol. 23 8v.

Mrs Emmerson tells Clare what she has said to Taylor.

Clare’s Mind, and heart, are alive to every object in Nature—he is the Crucible to receive all the scents, and hues, & forms, of simple, & material things—to analyze, and purify them, and give them forth in sweetest Song!—But in this Vol. —he proves himself capable of higher subjects than—talking of birds & flowers.

-199-

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