John Clare: The Critical Heritage

By Mark Storey | Go to book overview

95.

Unsigned notice, Literary Gazette

25 July 1835, no. 966, 465-6

O rus, quando te adspiciam!1 has been echoed by every being in city close ypent since the Roman poet uttered that nature-loving sentiment. With us it is a passion. We could babble o’ green fields for ever. Even these poor geraniums, and myrtles, and roses, which cheat our window into a horticultural sort of aspect, are dear to us, independently of their price in Covent Garden market. Peter Pastoral could not love the spring more, nor ride his hobby with greater avidity at the risk of spring guns. What pleasure, therefore, it is to pore over such a number of rural images as are here presented to us. The thermometer 114 in the shade—the lightest character of dress which propriety demands—every casement staring open—punkah refrigeration throughout, a la Nisbett—position horizontal—the legs of the sofa iced—and this small tome in hand, it is really delightful to ‘unfatigue’ oneself in these dog-days, wherein, if we may judge by the heat, according to the ancient proverb, every dog has his day.

A modest preface, we are sorry to say, mentioning ill health as a companion of the bard, ushers in the sweet rustic compositions contained in this volume: and Mr. Clare thus naturally addresses his theme:—

[Quotes ‘To the Rural Muse’, first two stanzas]

The poet loves the country, and observes it with a lover’s fondness; finding out and dwelling upon every beauty; now expatiating in their minute detail, and now clustering them together in their own wild profusion. ‘Summer Images’ offer many examples:—

[Quotes ‘Rich Music breathes in Summer’s every sound’ to ‘To greet me in the field’]

‘Thoughts in a Churchyard, ’ hackneyed as is the subject, breathe a tender melancholy:—

1 ‘O country home, when shall I see you?’ Horace, Satires, II, vi, 60.

-223-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
John Clare: The Critical Heritage
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 454

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.