The Image of the Indian: The Canadian Indian as a Subject and a Concept in a Sampling of the Popular National Magazines Read in Canada, 1900-1970

By Ronald Graham Haycock | Go to book overview

The WLU Monograph Series

The need for yet another publication series is surely open to question. Countless journals and monographs are in serious financial difficulty, a predicament also faced by more than one Canadian publisher.

Waterloo Lutheran University feels that a series is needed, the primary role of which will be to publish studies of high calibre which would normally be too lengthy for consideration as a journal article, but which ought to be made available with a minimum of delay. It is hoped that such studies will also be relatively inexpensive.

While every effort is being made to produce a coherent series, no single area or discipline will monopolize. Institutions may wish to subscribe to the series, but in fairness to individual subscribers is should be clear that widely differing disciplines will be represented.

The first volume is a timely study undertaken by Mr. R. G. Haycock of the Department of History, Waterloo Lutheran University. We hope it sets a standard which other volumes will maintain.

In the last few years there has been a growing debate over Canada's Indians. Demands have been made to see his condition improved, to have him improve it himself, to treat him with more equality, to preserve his culture and to give him a meaningful role in the mainstream of Canadian life. Many of the suggestions and comments offered by both whites and Indians run counter to each other. The obvious dilemma of the current controversy suggests that there is a very serious obstacle to overcome before any real solutions can be found. The obstacle is a simple dearth of knowledge. It is not just an absence of information about the Indians in Canada but indeed, an ignorance of all facets of Indian-white relations.

The major goal of this monograph is to tackle one aspect of the problem: the common image of the Indian. What has been undertaken is a seventy year examination of the Canadian Indian as a subject and a concept in the popular national magazines read in Canada since the turn of the century.

The image of the Indian was not a stable picture. It changed radically through the years as many new and strong forces influenced the Canadian mind. The present struggle for equality and civil rights for the Indian is not an isolated spontaneous response. Its indicators could be seen clearly years before.

It is hoped that this study will not only allow the non-Indian and Indian alike to see the historical images and attitudes as well as the forces that shaped and tempered them, but that it will contribute something to help overcome the dearth of organized information concerning the Indian in general.

Norman E. Wagner,
Director,
Graduate Studies and University Research.
July, 1971.

-ii-

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The Image of the Indian: The Canadian Indian as a Subject and a Concept in a Sampling of the Popular National Magazines Read in Canada, 1900-1970
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • The Wlu Monograph Series ii
  • Acknowledgements iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents viii
  • Part I- The Poor Doomed Savage 1900-1930 1
  • Part II- Humanitarian Awareness and Guilt 1930 - 1960 28
  • Part III- The Struggle For Equality and Civil Rights 1960 - 1970 56
  • Conclusion 90
  • Bibliography 93
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