The Image of the Indian: The Canadian Indian as a Subject and a Concept in a Sampling of the Popular National Magazines Read in Canada, 1900-1970

By Ronald Graham Haycock | Go to book overview

PART I
THE POOR DOOMED SAVAGE 1900-1930

The first thirty years of the Twentieth Century saw the Indian portrayed under five broad themes in the national popular magazines: religion, customs and manners, travelogue, popular history, and contemporary Indian affairs. Throughout these five recurrent ideas there generally ranges three basic threads of conception (either singly or in some combination) about the Canadian Indian. The most obvious is a Darwinistic paternalism: the red man is doomed to assimilation by the incursion of Anglo-Saxons because he is unable to survive in competitive evolution. The white, however, is trying his best to make the death struggle of the primative as soft as possible. The second view is that Indians are noble savages, children of nature who have prowess, cunning and dignity, yet tend to be ignorant and slothful in Anglo-Saxon eyes. The third conception is that the degenerate white has corrupted the Indian, but it is also an Anglo-Saxon virtue to raise the aboriginal to hitherto unprecedented levels of civilization and salvation, fashioned on the white model.

In the religious articles, the primary concern is with the Christianization of the Canadian Indian. Of five articles examined, two were written in a secular magazine, while the other three were published in religious periodicals. Canadian journalist and one of the founders of the Montreal Star, Marshall Scott,1 writing in Canadian Magazine in 1900, adamantly demanded that all paganism among Indians must be stamped out.2 In this piece of sensational journalism, the author described the ghoulish pagan practices, and as well, inferred a sense of duty and repulsion among whites concerning primative people. Pagans made up thirty per cent of Canadian aboriginals but "civilization is winning its way"3 and "old pagans of inferior blood are dying out faster than men of good race who wish to improve themselves."4 Not only was God included by the author as the secret for aboriginal improvement but help would also come from "the missionaries, the mounted police and the advancing waves of progress, with the help of Section 114 of the Criminal Code of Canada which forbids and punishes certain pagan rites . . ."5

____________________
1
W. H. Kesterton, A History of Journalism in Canada ( Toronto: McClelland and Stewart Ltd., 1967), p. 36. Scott was one of the founding fathers of the Star along with Sir Hugh Graham and George Thanigan in 1869.
2
M. O. Scott, "Pagan Indians of Canada" in Canadian Magazine, XV ( July, 1900), pp. 204-205.
3
Ibid., p. 204.
4
Ibid., p. 205.
5
Ibid., p. 206.

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Image of the Indian: The Canadian Indian as a Subject and a Concept in a Sampling of the Popular National Magazines Read in Canada, 1900-1970
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • The Wlu Monograph Series ii
  • Acknowledgements iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents viii
  • Part I- The Poor Doomed Savage 1900-1930 1
  • Part II- Humanitarian Awareness and Guilt 1930 - 1960 28
  • Part III- The Struggle For Equality and Civil Rights 1960 - 1970 56
  • Conclusion 90
  • Bibliography 93
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 98

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.