Andrew Marvell, the Critical Heritage

By Elizabeth Story Donno | Go to book overview

and there—but Taylor wished me not to disguise them under the names of others but publish them under the Title of ‘Visits of the Earlier Muses’ but I thought if I could succeed well I should like to have published them as old things found in imaginary Books & M. S. S. There would be no harm in it I think, would there?


50.

John Dove, from The Life of Andrew Marvell

1832

John Dove (fl. 1830) of Leeds, a ‘Whig and a Dissenter—terms all but synonymous with conceit, ignorance, presumption, and vulgarity’ in Hartley Coleridge’s disdainful words, published the first single biography of the poet. By his own admission he had collected his material from a variety of sources, particularly from Cooke, Thompson, Aikin, Disraeli, and the anonymous writer in the Retrospective Review, and his biography in turn was to provide Hartley Coleridge with the materials for two versions of his multiply—issued life of Marvell. More importantly, Dove printed seventeen poems. His only other publication was a history of the Wesley family (1840).

Extract from The Life of Andrew Marvell, the Celebrated Patriot (1832), pp. 1-2, 42, 48-9, 57-8, 67-8, 85.

It is the privilege of posterity to adjust the characters of illustrious persons:—ANDREW MARVELL has therefore become a celebrated name, and is now known as one of the most incorruptible patriots that England, or any other country, ever produced. The ‘British Aristides’ [see No. 33] has been long the great exemplar of public and private integrity. A character so exalted and pure astonished a

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