Andrew Marvell, the Critical Heritage

By Elizabeth Story Donno | Go to book overview

written in the same sort of verse, the octosyllabic of ‘fatal facility. ’ The following beautiful picture has not been given by any modern poet:

[Quotes ll. 529-32. ]

But a great blemish in most of Marvell’s poems is the occasional coarseness, surprising in the friend and contemporary of Milton; a perfect freedom from which is one of the many ennobling characteristics of that great writer.

The admiration of Marvell is to be based, not on his intellectual, but his moral qualities. Neither as a philosopher nor as a poet does Marvell belong to the first order of great minds. His intellectual merits are those of a wit and satirist; and though distinguished in that capacity, he could claim no particular notice beyond the crowds of wits and satirists who have blazed out their little hour and passed away. But Andrew Marvell possesses other claims to attention, other and higher demands on respectful and affectionate remembrance; and his name will not pass away. There is no man who worships political virtue, but must adore the memory of Marvell.


52.

Hartley Coleridge from The Worthies of Yorkshire and Lancashire

1832

In the summer of 1832, Hartley Coleridge (1796-1849) moved to Leeds to continue work on the series of biographies of notable figures from Yorkshire and Lancashire that had been started by John Dove (No. 50). Based on Dove and his sources, one version of his life of Marvell appeared in 1832 in the collection entitled The Worthies of Yorkshire and Lancashire; it was to be re-issued a number of times under different titles and imprints. A second version of his Life of Marvell,

-157-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Andrew Marvell, the Critical Heritage
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 386

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.