John Skelton: The Critical Heritage

By Anthony S. G.Edwards | Go to book overview

Contents
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS ix
INTRODUCTION 1
NOTE ON THE TEXT 42
1 WILLIAM CAXTON on Skelton, c. 1490 43
2 ERASMUS on Skelton, ‘that incomparable light and ornament of British letters’, c. 1499 43
3 ALEXANDER BARCLAY on ‘Philip Sparrow’, 1509 46
4 ‘The Great Chronicle of London’ on Skelton and his contemporaries, c. 1510 46
5 HENRY BRADSHAW on Skelton and other superior poets, c. 1513 47
6 WILLIAM LILY on Skelton: ‘neither learned, nor a poet’, c. 1519 48
7 ROBERT WHITTINTON in praise of Skelton, the ‘learned poet’, 1519 49
8 JOHN BALE on the life of Skelton, 1557 54
9 WILLIAM BULLEIN on Skelton’s satires on Wolsey, 1564 55
10 THOMAS CHURCHYARD in praise of Skelton, 1568 56
11 JOHN GRANGE on Skelton’s ‘ragged ryme’, 1577 59
12 WILLIAM WEBBE on Skelton: ‘a pleasant conceyted fellowe’, 1586 60
13 GEORGE PUTTENHAM on Skelton’s metre, 1589 60
14 GABRIEL HARVEY on Skelton, the ‘madbrayned knave’, c. 1573-80, 1592 62
15 ARTHUR DENT on Skelton’s immoral works, c. 1590 63
16 MICHAEL DRAYTON in praise of Skelton, c. 1600, 1606, 1619 64
17 ‘Pimlyco, or Runne Red-Cappe’ in praise of ‘Elynor Rumming’, 1609 66
18 NICHOLAS BRETON on Skelton’s ‘ruffling rimes’, 1612 68
19 HUMPHREY KING on Skelton and other ‘merry men’, 1613 68
20 WILLIAM BROWNE on Skelton, 1614 69
21 HENRY PEACHAM on Skelton’s unmerited reputation, 1622 69
22 ‘A Banquet of Jests’ on the neglect of Skelton, 1639 70
23 JAMES HOWELL on the neglect of Skelton, 1655 70
24 THOMAS FULLER’S biography of Skelton, 1662 71
25 EDWARD PHILLIPS on Skelton’s current obscurity, 1675 73

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
John Skelton: The Critical Heritage
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 226

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.