CHAPTER 8

The Mathematics of the Infinite, and the Impact of Cantor

[If] a man had a positive idea of infinite…, he could add two infinites together: nay, make one infinite infinitely bigger than another, absurdities too gross to be confuted. (John Locke)

For over two thousand years the human intellect was baffled by the problem [of infinity]….

A long line of philosophers, from Zeno to M. Bergson, have based much of their metaphysics upon the supposed impossibility of infinite collections…. The definitive solution of the difficulties is due…to Georg Cantor. (Bertrand Russell)

Apart from an anti-Aristotelian backlash among the medievals, spear-headed by Gregory of Rimini and partly followed through by the rationalists (see above, Chapters 3 and 5), the time up until the early-mid nineteenth century saw nothing but hostility towards the actual mathematical infinite. Some of the hostility was towards the mathematical infinite per se. We saw something of this in Hegel. But some of it was emphatically not that. It was hostility specifically to the actual mathematical infinite. Here, of course, the key figure was Aristotle, for whom the infinite was certainly to be understood in mathematical terms; what had to be resisted was the idea that it could be given ‘all at once’. For over two thousand years this was the prevailing view.

As this view developed and achieved the status almost of orthodoxy, the notion of being given ‘all at once’ came to be understood in increasingly metaphorical terms. Often it just meant being a legitimate object of mathematical study in its own right. And, from that point of view, mathematics itself bore witness to the prevailing hostility. For the infinite never really was regarded as a legitimate object of mathematical study in its own right. True, it continually impinged on mathematical consciousness. But this was only because mathematicians, in their study of finite objects such as natural numbers and lines, would constantly step back and

-110-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Infinite
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface to the Second Edition xi
  • Preface xx
  • Introduction: Paradoxes of the Infinite 1
  • Part One - The History 15
  • Chapter 1 - Early Greek Thought 17
  • Chapter 2 - Aristotle 34
  • Chapter 3 - Medieval and Renaissance Thought 45
  • Chapter 4 - The Calculus 57
  • Chapter 5 - The Rationalists and the Empiricists 75
  • Chapter 6 - Kant 84
  • Chapter 7 - Post-Kantian Metaphysics of the Infinite 96
  • Chapter 8 - The Mathematics of the Infinite, and the Impact of Cantor 110
  • Chapter 9 - Reactions 131
  • Part Two - Infinity Assessed 145
  • Chapter 10 - Transfinite Mathematics 147
  • Chapter 11 - The Löwenheim-Skolem Theorem 159
  • Chapter 12 - Gödel's Theorem 172
  • Chapter 13 - Saying and Showing 186
  • Chapter 14 - Infinity Assessed. the History Reassessed 201
  • Chapter 15 - Human Finitude 218
  • Glossary 234
  • Bibliography 250
  • Index 261
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 268

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.