Of Chastity and Power: Elizabethan Literature and the Unmarried Queen

By Philippa Berry | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction

1
I am indebted for this formulation to Luce Irigaray’s Speculum of the Other Woman, trans. Gillian C. Gill (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1986). See especially pp. 103, 135.
2
This transition has been analysed most interestingly in recent critical studies of the Essais of Michel de Montaigne, which were published in 1580 and 1595. See in particular Jean Starobinski, Montaigne in Motion, trans. Arthur Goldhammer (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1985), especially pp. 1-14; and Richard L. Regosin, The Matter of My Book: Montaigne’s Essais as the Book of the Self (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1977).
3
For two rather different accounts of the implications of this contrast between medieval and Renaissance attitudes to nature, see H. Paul Santmire, The Travail of Nature: the Ambiguous Ecological Promise of Christian Theology (Philadelphia: Fortress Press, 1985); and Keith Thomas, Man and the Natural World: Changing Attitudes in England 1500-1800 (London: Allen Lane, 1983).
4
The implications of this philosophical decentring of God and spirit in René Descartes’ Discourse on Method have been explored from a new historicist perspective by Francis Barker in The Tremulous Private Body: Essays on Subjection (London: Methuen, 1984), pp. 94-103.
5
Frances A. Yates, Astraea: the Imperial Theme in the Sixteenth Century (London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1975).
6
Leonard Tennenhouse, Power on Display: the Politics of Shakespeare’s Genres (London: Methuen, 1986), p. 30.
7
Especially influential in this respect has been Daniel Javitch’s Poetry and Courtliness in Renaissance England (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1976). See also Ann Rosalind Jones and Peter Stallybrass, ‘The politics of Astrophel and Stella’, Studies in English Literature, 24, i (Winter 1984), pp. 54-68, and Louis Adrian Montrose, ‘Celebration and insinuation: Sir Philip Sidney and the motives of Elizabethan courtship’, Renaissance Drama, n.s. VIII (1977), pp. 3-35.
8
Jonathan Dollimore, ‘Shakespeare, cultural materialism and the new historicism’, in Political Shakespeare: New Essays in Cultural Materialism, eds Jonathan Dollimore and Alan Sinfield (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1985), pp. 2-17.
9
Stephen Greenblatt, Renaissance Self-Fashioning: From More to Shakespeare (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1980).
10
Frank Lentricchia, Criticism and Social Change (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1983), p. 15.

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