Group Interactive Art Therapy: Its Use in Training and Treatment

By Diane Waller | Go to book overview

Chapter 2

Interactive group psychotherapy

The interactive or interpersonal approach to psychotherapy derives from the work of the neo-Freudians and in particular Harry Stack Sullivan (1953). Sullivan believed that an individual’s history influences every moment of his life, because it provides a dynamic structure and definition of his experiences. He saw anxiety as arising from threats to an individual’s self-esteem. The individual uses well-tried defences to deal with these threats. Stack Sullivan did not agree with Freud’s idea that the basic personality structure was laid down in early childhood: rather he felt it developed, through interaction with significant others, right through to adulthood and was therefore open to change. A person’s psychological growth, then, depends on a concept of the self which is largely based on how a person experiences himself in relation to others (see Ratigan and Aveline, 1988:47).

A very informative account of group interactive psychotherapy is given by Yalom (1975) and the model is well described by Ratigan and Aveline in ‘Group Psychotherapy in Britain’ (1988:43-64) and several therapeutic features of the model are explored by Bloch and Crouch (1985). I shall not try to reproduce their work in this chapter, but merely attempt to highlight some of the points that they make. I would recommend a thorough reading of these sources for further elucidation of history, theory and practice of the model.

Group interactive psychotherapy focusses on the actions, reactions and characteristic patterns of interaction which constrain people in their everyday lives and for which help in modifying is sought in the group (Ratigan and Aveline, 1988:45). A fundamental of the approach is that each person constructs an individual inner world which is continuously being reconstructed through interactions with others and which determines that person’s view of himself and others and affects expectations of others. In group therapy, the individual gradually realises how inner assumptions may determine the patterns of interaction that develop. Exploration of these patterns and willingness to modify them in the safety of the group enables the person to try out new ways of relating in the ‘outside world’. Clearly, then, the model places the main source of change in the interaction between

-22-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Group Interactive Art Therapy: Its Use in Training and Treatment
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 168

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.