Group Interactive Art Therapy: Its Use in Training and Treatment

By Diane Waller | Go to book overview

Chapter 6

Using themes or projects within an interactive model

So far I have discussed groups in which themes tend to arise spontaneously out of discussion among group members. There are times, though, when I have decided to present the group with a theme, or perhaps project is a better description, right at the beginning. This is usually when conducting time-limited workshops in which the participants need to understand about the potentiality of art therapy for themselves. On these occasions I have obviously stepped away from the group analytic end of the interactive spectrum. On the other hand, having presented the group with the idea for the project, it is up to the individual members and the group how they interpret it and how they subsequently use the material.

I have used the following open-ended projects with trainee art therapists, other professionals wanting an introduction to the process of interactive art therapy, patient groups—mainly of functioning out-patients with problems such as drug and alcohol addiction, eating disorders, depression and phobias. I have found them useful ways either to begin or to continue a time-limited workshop. They can be developed by each group according to its preoccupations at the time and to the level of the participants’ abilities. All the projects give ample opportunity for exploration of simple visual media—which in the case of non-art trained participants can be extremely useful for confidence building.


Self-boxes

This is a project which is useful to introduce at the beginning of a new group. It encourages members to focus on how they present themselves to the outside world and how they feel ‘inside’. It requires them to reflect on how much (if at all) they hide or disguise their feelings (or ‘real selves’) in the interests of conforming to others’ expectations (or expectations of their own). The project makes use of ordinary cardboard boxes as a starting-point and requires a range of easy-to-use materials. There is something quite reassuring about a cardboard box. There is nothing intrinsically precious about it. It can be obtained from any store or supermarket. This fact is quite

-59-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Group Interactive Art Therapy: Its Use in Training and Treatment
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 168

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.