The Theory of the Leisure Class: An Economic Study of Institutions

By Thorstein Veblen | Go to book overview

THE PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY.

An Analysis of the Phenomena of Association
and of Social Organization.

FRANKLIN HENRY GIDDINGS

Professor of Sociology in Columbia University, in the City of New York.

8vo. Cloth. $3.00,

"The book is especially valuable because of the clearness and fulness with which it discusses the psychical elements in social evolution.

"Professor Giddings has done good service by his clear exposition of the present stage of sociology, and he has made a distinct and valuable contribution to the subject. The book is also timely, and will doubtless have wide reading and command the attention of all students of the subject, not only because of Professor Giddings' acknowledged standing as a sociologist, but because of its intrinsic value. The style is particularly lucid, and the tone of the book is judicial throughout " —The Bookman.

" This is a book which has long been awaited with eager expectation by students of sociology. We have a valuable treatise which will, we believe, for many years to come be the text-book on this subject.

" Professor Giddings' work has in a high degree that most valuable characteristic of a contribution to human thought, suggestiveness. His discussion of the evolution of culture and tradition in his chapter on ' Demogenic Association' is especially rich in suggestion.

" Professor Giddings' book is highly stimulating. He is a vigorous thinker and a strong writer, and he has a broad knowledge of his subject and its various affiliations which is as refreshing as it is unusual in this day of scientific specialists and non-scientific sociologists.

" The book is well indexed and is accompanied by a valuable classified bibliography,—valuable, but by no means exhaustive."— The New Unity.

"The work is on an entirely new basis. There is nothing like it in literature. A glance at the table of contents will convince any one that it is a model of method. We feel convinced that as soon as it becomes known it will be accepted as an authority; and its value, coming in all its completeness at this early stage of the study of this science, cannot be exaggerated." — Minneapolis Tribune.

THE MACMILLAN COMPANY,
66 FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORK.

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The Theory of the Leisure Class: An Economic Study of Institutions
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