The Moral Virtues and Theological Ethics

By Romanus Cessario | Go to book overview

NOTES
1. NOTES FOR INTRODUCTION
In his De opificio Dei, chap. 12, Lactantius (c. 240-c.320) adopted the etymology proposed by Cicero, namely that virtus derives from vir. But in the Institutiones, Bk 6, chap. 5, he gives the notion further precision by insisting that virtue is an interior reality which effectively shapes human capacities to accomplish good deeds. Hence, Lactantius, who used the latter work to commend revealed truth to the educated class, rejected the philosophical claim which identified virtue with knowledge. Rather, the author argues that the divine dignity (dignatio divina) established in those who accept the truth of the Gospel results in more than simply new information: "Verum scientia non potest esse virtus, quia non est intus in nobis, sed ad nos extrinsecus venit" ( PL 6, col. 650).
For example, in Enarrationes in Psalmos 83, no. 11, Augustine identifies all virtue with the person of Christ himself: "Multae uirtutes, sed hic necessariae; et ab his uirtutibus imus in uirtutem. Quam uirtutem? Christum, Dei uirtutem, et Dei sapientiam, Ipse dat diuersas uirtutes in loco hoc, qui pro omnibus uirtutibus necessariis in conualle plorationis et utilibus dabit unam uirtutem, seipsum" ( Corpus Christianorum SL 39, p. 1157). "Now we require many virtues, and from these virtues we advance to virtue itself. What virtue, you inquire? I reply: Christ, the very virtue and wisdom of God. He gives diverse virtues here below, and he will also supply the one virtue, namely himself, for all of the other virtues which are useful and necessary in this vale of tears."
Enarrationes in Psalmos 70, no. 10: "Quid est: toll die? Sine intermissione. In prosperis, quia consolaris; in aduersis,

-157-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Moral Virtues and Theological Ethics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1- the Moral Virtues And Christian Faith 12
  • 2 - Habitus, Character, And Growth 34
  • 3. What is a Moral Virtue? 45
  • 4- Prudence and The Moral Virtues 72
  • 5- What Causes the Moral Virtues to Develop 94
  • 6- Characteristics Of The Virtues 126
  • Conclusion 151
  • Notes 157
  • Index of Subjects 198
  • Index of Names 201
  • Index of Scripture References 204
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 206

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.