Behaviour Problems in Young Children: Assessment and Management

By Jo Douglas | Go to book overview

Chapter one

Introduction: causes of behaviour problems

All parents face uncertainty, make mistakes, and ask for advice about coping with their children at some point during their child’s early years. These queries may be about how to manage a crying baby, at what age toilet training should start and how to do it, how much food should be offered at each meal, or how to cope with temper tantrums. But occasionally parents find that their child is so out of control that they become anguished, angry, distressed, and distraught. Such families have reached a point at which intervention from outside the family is required to help establish a happier and more fulfilling relationship between them.

This book aims to introduce the primary health care professional - the health visitor, the general practitioner, and the community physician - to the behaviour and emotional problems commonly seen in young children. Detailed plans for helping parents with management of these problems are outlined. Recent research findings are presented to provide a theoretical background to the advice being offered.


Prevalence

Richman and her colleagues (1982) carried out a research study into the behaviour problems of pre-school children that looked at 705 families living in central London. They found the following rates of behaviour disturbance in 3-year-olds:

15 per cent had mild problems

6.2 per cent had moderate problems

1.1 per cent had severe problems.

-1-

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Behaviour Problems in Young Children: Assessment and Management
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgements x
  • Chapter One - Introduction: Causes of Behaviour Problems 1
  • Chapter Two - Assessment of the Problem 16
  • Chapter Three - Positive Parenting 36
  • Chapter Four - Setting Limits 48
  • Chapter Five - Eating and Feeding Difficulties 67
  • Chapter Six - Toilet Training 94
  • Chapter Seven - Bedtime and Sleep Problems 116
  • Chapter Eight - Emotional Problems 135
  • Chapter Nine - The Overactive and Hyperactive Child 155
  • Chapter Ten - Crying Babies 176
  • References 191
  • Index 215
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