The Press Effect: Politicians, Journalists, and the Stories That Shape the Political World

By Kathleen Hall Jamieson; Paul Waldman | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction
1
Robert Entman, “Framing: Toward Clarification of a Fractured Paradigm,” Journal of Communication 43:51–58 (1993).
2
Oscar H. Gandy, Jr., “Epilogue,” in Stephen Reese, Oscar H Gandy, Jr., and August Grant, eds., Framing Public Life. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum, 2001, p. 365.
3
Gaye Tuchman, Making News: A Study in the Construction of Reality. New York: Free Press, 1978.
4
Herbert Gans, Deciding What's News. New York: Random House, 1979.
5
President Clinton vetoed the bill passed by Congress. In 2000, in the case of Stenberg v. Carhart the U.S. Supreme Court declared Nebraska's “partial birth abortion ban” unconstitutional, leaving in doubt whether the other bans could be enforced. ad,” featuring Horton's mug shot. Although Bush ran a well-known ad criticizing Dukakis's furlough program (known as “Revolving Door,” it featured supposed menacing convicts traveling in and then out of a turnstile), the Bush campaign itself did not air any ads containing Horton's photo.

Chapter 1
1
The documentation for our account of Bush's 1988 use of the Horton narrative is in Jamieson's Dirty Politics. New York: Oxford University Press, 1992.
2
Excerpted on the McNeil-Lehrer Newshour, September 16, 1988.
3
This conservative political action committee, not the Bush campaign, paid for what is generally remembered as the “Willie Horton ad,” featuring Horton's mug shot. Although Bush ran a well-known ad criticizing Dukakis's furlough program (known as “Revolving Door,” it featured supposed menacing convicts traveling in and then out of a turnstile), the Bush campaign itself did not air any ads containing Horton's photo.
4
Tom Raum, “Bush Waiting for Gore Concession,” Associated Press, December 13, 2000.
5
“Bush v Gore: The Fateful Ruling” New York Times, July 7, 2001, p. A12.
6
The Political Staff of the Washington Post,Deadlock: The Inside Story of America's Closest Election. New York: Public Affairs, 2001, pp. 234–235.
7
Anthony DePalma, “Cornwall Journal: In Tax Debate, A Hero or a Tobacco Hireling?” New York Times, June 27, 1998, p. A4.
8
Saundra Torry, “Tobacco Funds Allocation Adds Settlement Pressure,” Washington Post, February 3, 1998, p. A8.
9
Kathleen Hall Jamieson, Everything You Think You Know About Politics and Why You're Wrong. New York: Basic Books, 2000.
10
Papers of the President, August 4, 1964, p. 627.
11
Michael Beschloss, Reaching for Glory: Lyndon Johnson's Secret White House Tapes, 1964–1965. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2001, p. 39.
12
Keith Richburg, “Mission to Hanoi: McNamara Asks Ex-Foes to Join in Search for

-199-

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The Press Effect: Politicians, Journalists, and the Stories That Shape the Political World
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Introduction xi
  • The Press Effect *
  • Chapter 1 - The Press as Storyteller 1
  • Chapter 2 - The Press as Amateur Psychologist, Part I 24
  • Chapter 3 - The Press as Amateur Psychologist, Part II 41
  • Chapter 4 - The Press as Soothsayer 74
  • Chapter 5 - The Press as Shaper of Events 95
  • Chapter 6 - The Press as Patriot 130
  • Chapter 7 - The Press as Custodian of Fact 165
  • Conclusion 194
  • Notes 199
  • Index 209
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