Invisible Giants: Fifty Americans Who Shaped the Nation but Missed the History Books

By Mark Carnes | Go to book overview

Felix Francisco Varela y Morales
[20 NOVEMBER 1788–18 FEBRUARY 1853]

When Americans received letters in the year 2000 adorned with a Felix Varela commemorative stamp, most wondered who this foreigner was and why the Postal Service had enshrined his image. But every school child in Cuba for more than a century has known and claimed Varela. Such is the paradox of Latinos in American history: a giant of a man who spent the greatest part of his life in the United States does not figure into American collective memory. Never mind that he produced a magnificent corpus of philosophical, theological and literary texts, nor that he was a pioneer of American Catholicism. Is it because much of his writing was done in the Spanish language? Or that he was a Catholic priest in a then very Protestant, anti-papist country? Or that he did not readily identify with European culture, having been an exponent of the political and cultural independence of the New World? If these reasons were not enough to write him out of our early history, it did not help that he was an early abolitionist and ecumenist.

The author of the very first historical novel in the Spanish language, Jicoténcal , and the publisher of one of the first Spanishlanguage periodicals in the early Republic, El Habanero, Varela also published and edited various English-language Catholic magazines. While he was a cerebral and spiritual man, like many Latinos he knew well the plight of the immigrant and the poor, and worked untiringly for their betterment. His progressive ideas on lay governance of the Church and on the abolition of slavery were as unwelcome in some sectors of the United States as his ideas about Spanish American independence were anathema to the Spanish Crown. In fact, it was a criminal offense to utter Varela's name in Cuba, where his writings are thought to have been the first underground bestsellers. Ironically, in the country he knew best and that received the direct benefit of his labors, the United States that is,

-265-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Invisible Giants: Fifty Americans Who Shaped the Nation but Missed the History Books
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 316

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.