Beyond Primitivism: Indigenous Religious Traditions and Modernity

By Jacob K. Olupona | Go to book overview

Still, the question of power remains. If nineteenth-century comparative religion was fashioned at the intersection of academic discourse and imperial force, has the study of religion subsequently undergone a process of intellectual decolonization? Has it become self-critical of its own interests? Has it renounced the imperial privileges such as observation, representation, generalization, colonization, and control that made it possible? Here I think some progress has been made, even if the academic study of religion, in this regard, lags behind postcolonial developments in other disciplines within the human and social sciences. Even in such post-imperial or postcolonial initiatives, however, the problematic of power seems to remain intractable. On the one hand, renunciation appears as an option, as Edward Said, for example, has argued that a post-imperial scholarship “means not trying to rule others, not trying to classify them or put them in hierarchies, above all, not constantly reiterating how ‘our’ culture or country is number one” (1993:408). On the other hand, utopian dreams are tempting, visions of a world, as David Spurr has noted, “in which the play of difference could range free of the structures of inequality” (1993:201). Somewhere between renunciation and utopia, the one potentially paralyzing, the other practically impossible, comparative religion - as opening, as conversation, as interplay of difference, as the contrapuntal comparison of comparisons - might have a place in a post-imperial, postcolonial world.


References
Ackerknecht, Edwin, “On the comparative method in anthropology, ” in Robert F. Spencer (ed. ) Method and Perspective in Anthropology, Gloucester, MA: Peter Smith, 1969, 117-25.
Benham, Marian S., Henry Callaway M. D., D. D., First Bishop of Kaffraria: His Life History and Work: A Memoir, London: Macmillan, 1896.
Bleek, W. H. I., “Researches into the relations between the Hottentots and Kafirs, ” Cape Monthly Magazine 1 (January-June), 1857, 199-208, 289-96.
——, A Comparative Grammar of South African Languages. Part One, London: Trübner, 1862.
——, Reynard the Fox in South Africa; or Hottentot Fables and Tales, London: Trübner, 1864.
——, On the Origin of Language, ed. Ernst Haeckel, trans. Thomas Davidson, New York: L. W. Schmidt, 1869.
——, “Scientific reasons for the study of the Bushman language, ” Cape Monthly Magazine (n.s. ) 7, 1873, 149-53.
——, A Brief Account of Bushman Folklore and Other Texts, Cape Town: J. C. Juta, 1875.
——, Zulu Legends, ed. J. A. Engelbrecht, Pretoria: Van Schaik, 1952 [1857].
Bleek, W. H. I. and Lucy C. Lloyd, Specimens of Bushman Folklore, London: George Allen, 1911.
Bock, Kenneth E., “The comparative method of anthropology, ” Comparative Studies in Society and History 8, 1966, 269-80.
Callaway, Henry, Nursery Tales, Traditions, and Histories of the Zulus, 2 vols, Springvale: J. A. Blair and London: Trübner, 1866-68.
——, The Religious System of the Amazulu, Springvale: Springvale Mission, 1868-70 (reprinted Cape Town: Struik, 1970).
——, “On divination and analogous phenomena among the natives of Natal, ” Proceedings of the Anthropological Institute 1, 1872, 163-83.
——, A Fragment on Comparative Religion, Natal: Callaway, 1874.
——, “South African folk-lore, ” Cape Monthly Magazine 16(94) (February), 1878, 109-10.
——, “On the religious sentiment amongst the tribes of South Africa: lecture delivered at Kokstad, ” Cape Monthly Magazine (n.s. ) 2(5), 1880a, 87-102.
——, “A fragment illustrative of religious ideas among the Kafirs, ” Folklore 2(4) (July), 1880b, 56-60.

-86-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Beyond Primitivism: Indigenous Religious Traditions and Modernity
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 352

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.