Development and Local Knowledge: New Approaches to Issues in Natural Resources Management, Conservation, and Agriculture

By Alan Bicker; Paul Sillitoe et al. | Go to book overview

Chapter 7

International animation

UNESCO, biodiversity and sacred sites

Terence Hay-Edie

As a grand ethical endeavour, the founding constitution of the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) states, ‘that since wars begin in the minds of men, it is in the minds of men that the defences of peace need to be constructed’. From its inception, UNESCO’s mission statement thus positions the organization as a pre-eminently intellectual pursuit. However, quite unlike related academic disciplines, the UN specialized agency remains an international development agency officially composed of governments. Nation states, which constitute UNESCO’s core membership, provide the institution with regular budgetary contributions and expect it to operate as an efficient bureaucratic body capable of administering a range of specialized programmes. 1

This anthropologist’s interest in UNESCO stems from a one-year engagement within the division of ecological sciences at the organization’s headquarters in Paris between 1995-1996. In the description that follows, I go on to briefly introduce my own involvement as anthropologist in the conceptualization of an inter-sectorial programme designed to revalorize forms of ‘vernacular conservation’ of biodiversity based on indigenous knowledge. The proposed initiative provided a useful point of departure to explore a network of relations beyond the ‘tower of glass’ of the UNESCO-HQ secretariat, including ethnographic research at the annual Working Group on Indigenous Populations held at the United Nations in Geneva, as well as during a regional seminar held in India.

With over 30 regional offices worldwide, UNESCO is both scattered geographically, as well as dispersed conceptually in an array of symbolic transformations. Fieldwork thus attempted to engage multiple facets of the organization at headquarters, as well as in associated events further afield. By tracking a range of different UNESCO activities, I encountered numerous other actors also copying and adjusting themselves to fit the broad institutional discourse of the international organization. Much of the UNESCO process emanating from the central headquarters thus revolved around a template of action offering predetermined global categories, unfinished with local details, waiting to be sculpted or filled in at the periphery.

-118-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Development and Local Knowledge: New Approaches to Issues in Natural Resources Management, Conservation, and Agriculture
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 222

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.