Political Corruption: In and beyond the Nation State

By Robert Harris | Go to book overview

4

National political corruption (II): the United Kingdom1

The cost of transparency in politics is that we will all have to learn to distinguish between a genuine scandal and antics which, however diverting, do not affect the way we are governed.

(Baston 2000:9)

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a low-corruption country. This is not to say either that it has always been thus or that the UK lacks all forms of structural corruption: indeed we shall show that neither of these propositions is correct. In fact the process by which Great Britain transformed itself in the early- to mid-nineteenth century from a high- to a low-corruption country is a central theme of this chapter. We proceed by offering a brief historical analysis of changing patterns of corruption in the polity as a whole up to the mid-nineteenth century; there-after we consider issues of governance in relation to central government, local government and the Civil Service. From this analysis it should be possible to identify, first, the main factors associated with the decline in institutional corruption and, second, the areas in which, and the extent to which, the United Kingdom remains most vulnerable to a resurgence of corruption today.

Naturally the contemporary situation in the United Kingdom contrasts sharply with that of high-corruption countries such as China. There corruption permeates the structures of governance, and, because the primary aim of anti-corruption strategies is normally to eliminate targeted individuals in order to enhance the power of the ruling elite, such strategies are themselves usually symptoms of corruption, not potential cures for it. In high-corruption countries the instruments of governance typically lack transparency, accountability, self-corrective mechanisms, constitutional safe-guards and judicial independence. There is, as it were, no reliable political, judicial or bureaucratic thermostat to restore the polity to a functioning steady state following the exposure of corruption. Hence in high-corruption countries whistle-blowing is virtually non-existent, corruption symbiotic and, in the case of junior recruits, effectively compulsory.

-97-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Political Corruption: In and beyond the Nation State
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 252

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.