Key Issues in Organizational Communication

By Dennis Tourish; Owen Hargie | Go to book overview

9

Blending attitudes and motivation

A key cocktail

Harald Valås and Olav Sletta


Introduction

Motivation theories and motivation-enhancing strategies and techniques have attracted considerable interest in the organizational and management sciences. However, management science is ‘notoriously faddish’, which means that theories and strategies tend to move in and out of favour (Furnham, 1992:152). While enjoying popularity, they are adopted by organizations, perhaps based on unrealistic or even naive expectations of success. In that case the result is disillusionment, dropping of strategies, and replacement by others. Little is known about the long-term effects of jumping from one fashion to another. This is hardly a pleasant state of affairs, as indicated in Norwegian educational literature by the term ‘kangaroo organization’.

During the last few decades the nature and conditions of work have changed. The national and international competition in industry requires hard-working, flexible, creative, highly work-motivated and competent employees, who are also a company’s most important capital. Thus, the company needs a staff with positive attitudes to their work and their workplace to maintain the company’s competence and productivity, and to be able to meet future competition.

Within this world of work, motivation is an important concern, and few things are more urgent or more troubling for managers in their efforts to promote organizational effectiveness than the job satisfaction and motivation of their subordinates. Consequently, the important question is how to promote the workers’ job satisfaction and motivation and thus keep the company’s skilled labour.

According to organizational scientists, attitudes play a central role in their discipline (Brief, 1998). However, the definitions of attitude on which their research is founded tend to be narrow, in the sense that focus may be on one attitudinal component only (for example on feelings). This state of the art means that our ‘blending of attitudes and motivation’ requires a conceptual clarification as a starting point. Our conceptual and theoretical discussions will be based on educational psychology and the social psychology of education in combination with organizational studies. To date, relatively little of the social psychology literature on attitude formation has been applied by organizational scientists (Brief, 1998:69)

-144-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Key Issues in Organizational Communication
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 304

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.