Constructing Belonging: Class, Race, and Harlem's Professional Workers

By Sabiyha | Go to book overview

CHAPTER FIVE

Work, Income, Wealth, and Resources

THE BROAD IMPACT OF LABOR ON THE HUMAN EXPERIENCE IS CENTRAL TO any thorough discussion of class. Work affects the natural environment, local infrastructures, transnational processes, and access to resources, prestige, and social identity. Work is the primary factor in determining how socioeconomic status is perceived and experienced. This chapter looks at income generation among the women and men that participated in this study from a perspective that will illuminate historical continuities and divergences from past patterns.


LINKING WORK, INCOME, AND WEALTH

Obtaining information on individual’s earnings was an important but elusive goal in my research design. Few women and men conveyed the exact amount of their earnings to me and as I indicate in chapter one, in accordance with the social taboo against openly divulging this kind of information, I did not directly question the project participants about the specifics of their salaries. Instead I made estimates about their earnings through indirect information.

I considered the range incomes associated with particular occupations based on the sector of the economy in which the person was involved. I was mindful of comments or complaints made about personal finances, and would initiate informal discussions about money and spending. In some instances, we talked about budgeting and plans for major expenditures. I carefully observed both the appearance of each household I visited and individual attire to gain insight into what these may indicate about earnings. It is because of these existing and self-imposed limitations that I present my discussion of income in a more general way. The strategies I used precluded the generation of hard numbers.

-67-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Constructing Belonging: Class, Race, and Harlem's Professional Workers
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 164

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.