Wildlife in Asia: Cultural Perspectives

By John Knight | Go to book overview

3

REPRESENTATIONS OF HUNTING IN JAPAN

John Knight


Introduction

Hunting is readily defined in terms of the primary relationship between the human hunter(s) and the hunted animal. Human hunting centres on an elemental confrontation between hunters and unrestrained wild animals that results in the violent killing of these animals (Cartmill 1993:29-30). But there is also a secondary set of hunting relations in the form of the social context in which the activity of hunting takes place. This wider set of relations is especially significant in the case of recreational hunting in urban—industrial societies. As an activity that combines violence and sport, recreational hunting is often subject to disapproval and moral critique in the wider human society As a result of the intensity and ubiquity of such criticism, hunting ceases to be simply a physical activity and tends to develop a capacity for rhetorical self-defence. Recreational hunters do not just hunt, but must also justify or rationalize hunting to the wider society in which they live. Hunters are often obliged to represent their hunting as consistent with the larger public interest. This is the background to the familiar utilitarian justification of hunting as a form of pest control found among hunters and shooters in many societies, including English fox-hunters (Marvin 2000) and snake and pigeon shooters in rural America (Weir 1992; Song 2000).

This chapter examines hunting in modern Japan, with specific reference to representations of the hunt and its dangers among hunters and non-hunters in rural areas. Three sets of representations of hunting in Japan are discussed: hunting as a contest with animals and among men, hunting as protection of the wider rural community from dangerous animals and hunting as itself a danger both to the practitioners and to the wider rural public. In Japan, hunting (especially wild boar-hunting) is marked by a symbolism of contest and conquest, while also represented by Japanese hunters in instrumentalist terms as a means of protecting the wider rural society from wildlife pests. On top of these symbolic and utilitarian representations of the hunt, however, hunting in Japan is viewed as a source of danger. This includes both the physical danger posed by the

-56-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Wildlife in Asia: Cultural Perspectives
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 260

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.