China, Where It Is Today and Why

By Thomas F. Millard | Go to book overview

FOREWORD

ALTHOUGH this work is journalese, being composed principally of my correspondence from China during 1925, 1926, and 1927, as published in the New York Times, the New York World, Asia magazine, The Nation, and The New Republic, it aims to show the principles, motives, conditions, and underlying forces which give impulse and direction to events rather than to describe those events objectively. If this method leaves out much that is interesting and dramatic, it may present the problem better for critical examination. The time covers a strenuous and important period of China's uneasy political evolution. I am not conscious of bias for any nation except my own, or of prejudice against any nation or people whatever.

I have thought it better not to enlarge the volume by including documents and by quoting authoritative utterances and opinions to fortify and expound the subject matter. For more information and light on some points I recommend Dr. W. W. Willoughby books, China at the Conference and Foreign Rights and Interests in China, and his work on the opium question. Those who want to delve deeper into the history and governance of Shanghai should read Mr. A. W. Kotenev Shanghai; Its Mixed Court and Council and Shanghai; Its Municipality and the Chinese. A trenchant criticism of the faults and delinquencies of the Chinese is given in Mr. Rodney Gilbert What's Wrong With China? A brochure by Putnam- Weale describing conditions along the Yiangsi River in

-v-

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China, Where It Is Today and Why
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword v
  • Contents vii
  • Orientation 1
  • Flux 19
  • Privilege 89
  • Help 143
  • Influences 173
  • Citadels of Standpattism 241
  • Get Out or Get In? 317
  • Index 339
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