News and Journalism in the UK

By Brian McNair | Go to book overview

2

JOURNALISM AND ITS CRITICS
This chapter contains:
• A brief history of the governing principles of British journalism
• A discussion of the main criticisms of journalistic practice which have emerged from the Academy, including the work of the Glasgow University Media Group, Noam Chomsky and Pierre Bourdieu.

To understand contemporary journalism, in Britain and in other capitalist societies, one must first know something about the two concepts which have historically underpinned its organisation and production: liberal pluralism and objectivity. This chapter discusses the origins of these concepts and the criticisms which have been made of them. It then reviews the contemporary critical debate around tabloidisation and ‘dumbing down’.


Liberal pluralism and press freedom

The invention of printing - which represented the birth of mass communication, and was the precondition for the emergence of journalism as a media form - coincided with the upsurge of religious, political and social strife which accompanied the late medieval period. Medieval societies were autocratic, in that they were dominated by an aristocracy and led by a monarchy with absolute power, in cooperation with the institutions of the Church. These institutions exercised strict control over politics, ideology and culture, powers which were claimed to derive from the divine will

-30-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
News and Journalism in the UK
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents ix
  • Figure and Tables xi
  • Preface to the Fourth Edition xii
  • Part I - The View from the Academy 1
  • 1 - Why Journalism Matters 3
  • 2 - Journalism and Its Critics 30
  • 3 - Explaining Content 54
  • Part II - Issues 79
  • 4 - Broadcast Journalism 81
  • 5 - Television Journalism: 104
  • Further Reading 140
  • 6 - Radio 141
  • 7 - Before and After Wapping 153
  • Further Reading 176
  • 8 - Competition, Content and Calcutt 177
  • 9 - The Regional Story 198
  • 10 - Conclusion 219
  • Notes 226
  • Bibliography 235
  • Index 241
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 256

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.