News and Journalism in the UK

By Brian McNair | Go to book overview

6

RADIO
This chapter contains:
• A review of key events in the development of radio journalism from the 1980s to the present
• A discussion of the past, present and future of the BBC World Service.

Radio has traditionally been viewed, by producers and audiences alike, as the ‘Cinderella medium’ - television’s poor relation. In an era of rapidly proliferating television channels, radio’s presumed inferiority has frequently given rise to the view that its future is problematic, and in the 1990s something akin to a siege mentality developed on the part of those who worked in the medium. Fortunately, as noted in Chapter 1, reports of radio’s death have been shown to be exaggerated. Since breakfast television services began in the UK, despite the belief of many that early morning radio audiences would decline, they have in fact increased consistently. The last decade has been one in which radio channels, like television, expanded, fuelled by persistently healthy ratings and market research evidence that popular demand for radio services remains high. Radio, it would appear, retains its distinctive appeal as a form of communication which can be consumed while mobile and while engaged in a variety of other pursuits, and whose mode of functioning is quite different from that of the visual media.

Within radio as a whole, journalism and speech services remain prominent. Question marks have been raised, however, over the extent to which a quantitative expansion of radio will lead in

-141-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
News and Journalism in the UK
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents ix
  • Figure and Tables xi
  • Preface to the Fourth Edition xii
  • Part I - The View from the Academy 1
  • 1 - Why Journalism Matters 3
  • 2 - Journalism and Its Critics 30
  • 3 - Explaining Content 54
  • Part II - Issues 79
  • 4 - Broadcast Journalism 81
  • 5 - Television Journalism: 104
  • Further Reading 140
  • 6 - Radio 141
  • 7 - Before and After Wapping 153
  • Further Reading 176
  • 8 - Competition, Content and Calcutt 177
  • 9 - The Regional Story 198
  • 10 - Conclusion 219
  • Notes 226
  • Bibliography 235
  • Index 241
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 256

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.