Garden Spot: Lancaster County, the Old Order Amish, and the Selling of Rural America

By David Walbert | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

This book began decades ago when I was a child in Lancaster County and has been slowly forming ever since, and it has been helped along the way by more people than I can count. I probably owe a great deal to the two or three hundred residents of East Drumore Township who turned out on a fall evening in 1990 to protest a planned development near my childhood home; it was at that meeting, listening to their arguments pro and con, that I began thinking seriously about the issues I address in this book. During the time I spent in Lancaster doing research, the people I met in libraries, at tourist attractions, and even at the grocery store were unfailingly helpful and interested in my work. Anne Kenne of Franklin and Marshall College's Special Collections Library, Tom Ryan and the staff of the Lancaster County Historical Society, and Carolyn Wenger of the Lancaster Mennonite Historical Society were all tremendously helpful in finding and identifying source materials, and the staff of the microforms desk at the Lancaster Public Library never once complained about the stacks of film I left for re-filing on a daily basis. Elizabeth Logan, Scott Standish, June Mengel, Ivan Glick, and Alan Musselman all lent me materials that I was too slow in returning. Fred Daum gave me a behind-the-scenes tour, both real and verbal, of Lancaster's farm preservation movement that helped me to understand its personal side in a way that documents and newspaper articles could not.

This book would never have taken the shape it did without the advice of my graduate advisor, Peter Filene, who saw the project through its first incarnation. For his thoughtful reading and commentary, his support and enthusiasm, and most of all for his willingness to believe in me and in this project at a time when he had little objective reason to do so, I will be forever grateful. Jacquelyn Hall similarly encouraged me, once upon a time, to take a chance on this project. Others who read drafts, listened, and offered their thoughts include Alison Isenberg, Jim Leloudis, Catherine Lutz, Kathy Newfont, and Deborah Pedersen. No doubt I

-ix-

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Garden Spot: Lancaster County, the Old Order Amish, and the Selling of Rural America
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Contents xii
  • Garden Spot *
  • Introduction - A Fertile Soil 3
  • 1 - The Invention of Lancaster County 11
  • 2 - Education, Literacy, and the Little Red Schoolhouse 37
  • 3 - The Amish and Tourism 67
  • 4 - Food and Farming 101
  • 5 - Urbanization and Planning 137
  • 6 - Development and Farm Preservation 171
  • Epilogue - The Harvest 209
  • Appendix - Farms and Population of Lancaster County, 1900–2000 219
  • Notes 223
  • Index 253
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