Garden Spot: Lancaster County, the Old Order Amish, and the Selling of Rural America

By David Walbert | Go to book overview

APPENDIX
Farms and Population of Lancaster County, 1900–2000

Several demographic trends that I have described in chapters 2 and 4 through 6 are more easily evident from U.S. Census figures. Table A.1 shows three ways of looking at the rural and urban population of Lancaster County since 1950. The first is to consider the city of Lancaster and its suburbs (the “urban fringe”) together as the urban population center of the county; in census terms, this constitutes the “urbanized area” of Lancaster city. Since 1950, the suburbs have grown dramatically—actually, dramatically is an understatement—as a proportion of the county's total population, while the city has lost population in absolute terms and, correspondingly, dwindled to a nearly insignificant fraction of the county. The second measure of urban and rural population is the relative decline of boroughs (small towns) with respect to townships, which suggests a declining portion of the population living in areas with a central core. To a certain extent, this conclusion only repeats the first, since all of Lancaster's suburbs (the urban fringe) are in townships; subtracting the suburban population from the aggregate figures for population leaves a much smaller growth in township population in the remaining “rural” part of the county. But the suburbs have grown not only in population but also in area, absorbing many previously rural areas. The result is a bit of a paradox, as I suggested in chapter 5. While the metropolitan center of the county now holds a far greater portion of the county's population than it did in 1950, Lancaster Countians are, in another sense, more dispersed than they were a half-century ago.

The third measure of rural and urban population is an aggregate of the first two. “Urban areas,” here, include the city of Lancaster, its urban fringe, and the boroughs. (Lacking data for unincorporated villages, I was unable to consider these as separate “urban” entities, even setting aside the question of whether they should be considered as such.) Urban areas, in other words, include population centers and their immediate vicinities. “Rural areas” are everything else. Since

-219-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Garden Spot: Lancaster County, the Old Order Amish, and the Selling of Rural America
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Contents xii
  • Garden Spot *
  • Introduction - A Fertile Soil 3
  • 1 - The Invention of Lancaster County 11
  • 2 - Education, Literacy, and the Little Red Schoolhouse 37
  • 3 - The Amish and Tourism 67
  • 4 - Food and Farming 101
  • 5 - Urbanization and Planning 137
  • 6 - Development and Farm Preservation 171
  • Epilogue - The Harvest 209
  • Appendix - Farms and Population of Lancaster County, 1900–2000 219
  • Notes 223
  • Index 253
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 258

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.