Garden Spot: Lancaster County, the Old Order Amish, and the Selling of Rural America

By David Walbert | Go to book overview

NOTES

Abbreviations

Frey Collection: William J. Frey Collection of Pennsylvania Germania (MS 39), Franklin and Marshall College Archives and Special Collections Library

Intelligencer Journal: Lancaster (Pa.) Intelligencer Journal

Lancaster Ephemera Collection: Lancaster County Ephemera Collection (MS 40), Franklin and Marshall College Archives and Special Collections Library

LCPC: Lancaster County Planning Commission

New Era: Lancaster New Era

Sunday News: Lancaster (Pa.) Sunday News

Tourist Brochures Collection: Tourist Brochures of Lancaster County Collection (MG-95), Lancaster County Historical Society


Introduction

The epigraph is from Raymond Williams, The Country and the City (New York: Oxford University Press, 1973), 248.

1
See Kenneth Wilkinson, The Community in Rural America (New York: Greenwood, 1991), and James H. Copp, ed., Our Changing Rural Society: Perspectives and Trends (Ames: Iowa State University Press, 1964).
2
Gary Comstock, ed., Is There a Moral Obligation to Save the Family Farm? (Ames: Iowa State University Press, 1987), xxv.
3
Because political liberals have largely taken over the term “progressive” in the twentieth century and because the term “progress” so automatically connotes positive change, the distinction I draw here between progressives and preservationists may be uncomfortable to some readers. The division does not, however, mirror more familiar political divisions. My use of these terms is similar to the ideas developed by T. J. Jackson Lears in No Place of Grace: Antimodernism and the Transformation of American Culture, 1880–1920 (New York: Pantheon, 1981). Lears describes the “complacent faith in progress” that dominated American culture at the turn of the twentieth century and the wave of antimodernism that rose up, albeit somewhat ambivalently, against it.

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Garden Spot: Lancaster County, the Old Order Amish, and the Selling of Rural America
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Contents xii
  • Garden Spot *
  • Introduction - A Fertile Soil 3
  • 1 - The Invention of Lancaster County 11
  • 2 - Education, Literacy, and the Little Red Schoolhouse 37
  • 3 - The Amish and Tourism 67
  • 4 - Food and Farming 101
  • 5 - Urbanization and Planning 137
  • 6 - Development and Farm Preservation 171
  • Epilogue - The Harvest 209
  • Appendix - Farms and Population of Lancaster County, 1900–2000 219
  • Notes 223
  • Index 253
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