White Violence and Black Response: From Reconstruction to Montgomery

By Herbert Shapiro | Go to book overview

ELEVEN
The NAACP and Radical Voices

THE 1930s put every organized segment of the black community to the test of adapting itself to the urgent situation produced by the Great Depression; to stand still was to risk irrelevance. The NAACP, with middle-class roots and a mass following that extended beyond that class, was particularly sensitive to the changed conditions and, although not without some difficulty, it managed to retain a leadership position among Afro-Americans. As the center of gravity of black opinion drifted leftward toward support of industrial unionism and embraced the New Deal, and as blacks often saw a new legitimacy in the views of the Communist party, the association also drifted to the Left but at the same time retained its place as a voice of moderation. It continued its championing of civil rights, took a friendlier view of labor unionism, but also maintained its emphasis on working through the courts and avoided any formal involvement with Communists in united front activity, especially on the national level. The opinions of white liberals were still a significant factor in shaping the organization's direction. Reacting to the enhanced position of leftists within the black community, the association accelerated its antilynching activities, thereby providing a focus for broader unity while seeking to strengthen its ability to compete with the radicals for the allegiance of the masses. It should be noted that for much of this period the NAACP was in the position of responding to pressures coming from the Left.

A shift in the association's position was a process, and a significant episode in that process was the divergence between W. E. B. Du Bois, editor of the Crisis, and the main group of the organization's officers. The question of racist violence and of black response to that violence was one of the issues addressed in that debate. There were, to be sure, personal elements in the rupture. Du Bois did not believe that Walter White was the proper person to lead the NAACP, and there was also Du Bois's perception that the organization was in a state of general crisis. In mid-1934 he wrote that the association's leaders were called upon "to

-273-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
White Violence and Black Response: From Reconstruction to Montgomery
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 565

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.