Against the Odds: Scholars Who Challenged Racism in the Twentieth Century

By Benjamin P. Bowser; Louis Kushnick et al. | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

The editors thank people on both sides of the Atlantic who made this work possible. In the United States, Nathalia Bowser, Blanche Pugh, and Walter Stafford were the Harlem connections to Kenneth Clark, Robert Weaver, and Hylan Lewis. Elder Cage and Herbert Parker were the Chicago connections to John Glover Jackson. Eric Cyrs, Jackson's biographer, helped complete his interview-essay. In the United Kingdom, Rebekah Delsol, Julie Devonald, Ken Sou, and other members of the staff of the Ahmed Iqbal Ullah Race Relations Archive provided invaluable assistance in the production of this book. We also acknowledge the contribution made by Jenny Bourne, A. Sivanandan, Hazel Waters, and other colleagues at the Institute of Race Relations through their principled leadership in the antiracist struggle and their support for this book.

Gary Okihiro introduced me to Herbert Aptheker, and Herbert and Faye Aptheker introduced me to John Hope Franklin and the spirit of W. E. B. Du Bois. K. Deborah Whittle, my wife, gave me the strength and continuity to see this project through from idea to completion. She not only accepted my days upon days of writing, transcribing, and traveling but also joined me in conducting interviews. Louis Kushnick, my partner in the struggle and coeditor of Sage Race Relations Abstracts, refused to let either time or distance stand between us in the completion of this project. His outrage at racism, his humor, and his dedication to this project were essential.—B. P. B.

I thank Huw Beynon, Dorothy Katzenellenbogen, Simon Katzenellenbogen, Patricia Kushnick, and Jacqueline Ould for their support and encouragement.—L. K.

-ix-

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Against the Odds: Scholars Who Challenged Racism in the Twentieth Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Against the Odds *
  • Introduction - Moving the Race Mountain 1
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • 1 - A World Libertarian 20
  • 2 - Portrait of a Liberation Scholar 27
  • 3 - A Lifetime of Inquiry 41
  • 4 - The Career of John Hope Franklin 63
  • 5 - The Work and Reflections of St. Clair Drake 86
  • 6 - Blending Scholarship with Public Service 111
  • Notes 122
  • References and Further Reading *
  • 7 - Some Personal Reflections of Hylan Lewis 123
  • 8 - An Architect of Social Change 147
  • Notes 156
  • References *
  • 9 - The Person, Scholar, and Activist 158
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • 10 - Vindication in Speaking Truth to Power 193
  • Notes *
  • 11 - A. Sivanandan as Activist, Teacher, and Rebel 227
  • References 242
  • Conclusion - Of Jim Crow Old and New 243
  • Notes *
  • References *
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