Gender and Text in the Later Middle Ages

By Jane Chance | Go to book overview

Notes
1. Bynum, Holy Feast and Holy Fast; Petroff, ed., Medieval Women's Visionary Literature.
2. For much of the information about Madre Juana I am indebted to the study by Surtz, Guitar of God.
3. See Giles, Book of Prayer of Sor María; and Blecua, ed., Libro de la Oración. Throughout this essay the English translations are from the book by Giles and the Spanish text is from the Blecua edition (unpaginated; page numbers in parentheses after citations reflect my own numbering).
4. Ronald E. Surtz studies this sermon in a separate chapter in The Guitar of God, 15-35.
5. See chapter 3 of the study by Surtz.
6. See Ong, Presence of the Word and Technology of the Word.
7. This description of the enraptured soul, based on St. Teresa's own experience, is found in the sixth mansions of the Interior Castle, ed. and trans. Peers Peers, 154-55:

For when He means to enrapture this soul, it loses its power of breathing, with the result that, although its other senses sometimes remain active a little longer, it cannot possibly speak. At other times it loses all its powers at once, and the hands and the body grow so cold that the body seems no longer to have a soul-sometimes it even seems doubtful if there is any breath in the body.

8. For this discussion of twentieth-century theater I gratefully acknowledge the contribution of my colleague, Janelle Reinelt. For a particularly insightful discussion of "holy theater" see Auslander, "'Holy Theatre.'"
9. Grotowski, Towards a Poor Theatre, 40.
10. The translations by the author are based on the transcriptions of the original manuscript, which is found in a study by Gómez López, "Sor Juana de la Cruz," 621. Further references to the sermon on the Immaculate Conception are to the transcriptions provided in this article.
11. Ibid., 622.
12. Ibid., 623.
13. Ibid.
14. Surtz, "El libro del Conorte."
15. Ibid., 12.
16. The origins of European theater in religious liturgy and the close connection between drama and religion in the Middle Ages and Renaissance are documented profusely. Foundational studies on the subject include: Tydeman, Theatre in the Middle Ages; Chambers, Medieval Stage. The same subject from the Spanish perspective is served well by Huerta Calvo, Teatro medieval y renacentista; and J. Crawford, Spanish Drama Before Lope de Vega.
17. See Arenal and Schlau, Untold Sisters.

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