Leading and Managing People in the Dynamic Organization

By Randall S. Peterson; Elizabeth A. Mannix | Go to book overview

8
Integrative Interests? Building a Bridge
Between Negotiation Research
and the Dynamic Organization
Kathleen M. O'Connor
Wendi L. Adair
Cornell University

In this chapter we explore the potential link between theory and research on negotiation with the concept of dynamic organizations. The drive to constantly reinvent their organizations and reshape their markets requires members of dynamic organizations to innovate, collaborate, redeploy, and take initiative. Coincidentally, these are the kinds of activities that negotiators must be ready to undertake if they are to craft-high value, durable deals. In the first half of the chapter, we draw connections between the demands facing members of dynamic organizations and the skills necessary for effective negotiation. In the second half, we consider whether the existence of agile organizations holds any implications for negotiation scholars. We offer some thoughts on how negotiation research might incorporate the dynamism that distinguishes dynamic organizations from other organizations. Along the way we raise a number of questions for future study.

Maintaining a competitive advantage is every firm's goal. What separates dynamic organizations from the pack, however, is that they pursue their aims by continuously reinventing themselves and their marketplaces (Hamel, 2000). In the first chapter of this volume, Dyer argues that dynamic organizations do not just keep pace with changes in their competitive environments, but they reinvent those marketplaces to maximize their edge. This requires them to continuously change the rules of the competitive game, to aggressively exploit emerging opportunities, and to adapt quickly to unanticipated events in the marketplace (Dyer, chapter 2, this volume). And the people who work in these organizations must have the necessary skills and tools to re fine their business processes, product lines, marketing plans, or investment strategies to address the challenges and opportunities the marketplace presents.

-163-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Leading and Managing People in the Dynamic Organization
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 379

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.