Diversity in Advertising: Broadening the Scope of Research Directions

By Jerome D. Williams; Wei-Na Lee et al. | Go to book overview

ENDNOTES
1
These data should, however, be interpreted with caution, as the sample of Blackparticipants was rather small (n = 8).
2
What Fazioetal. call “over compensation” seems similar to what has elsewhere been termed“overcorrection” (Wegener & Petty, 1995). Although I will consistently use the former term, I see The two as interchangeable. In either case, an actoris attempting to undoor avoid The effects of a presumed bias, but because of aflawedimplicit theory about the magnitude of the bias, the corrective or compensating process is excessive.
3
Given the demographic s of the student body from whichparticipants were drawn(over whelmingly majority White), we suspect that most participants assumed that the alternative to the Blackpartner was, in fact, a White partner.
4
In pretesting, the majority of participants indicated that the ywould assume the owner of such a sweatshirt was Black. Ithank Joanne Millerfor suggesting the use of the sweatshirtto imply the owner's race.
5
In fact, a follow-up study suggested that the IAT did not predict scores on either the MRS or the Attitudes Toward Blacks Scale(Sargent & The Il, 2002), each of which solicits re actions to only Blacks. Importantly, this was true even among individuals low on either subscale of the Motivation to Control Prejudiced Re Actions Scale(Dunton & Fazio, 1997). Just as the participants in the high attributional ambiguity condition of the experiment just reportedwere presumed to be relatively unconcerned about appearing or acting prejudiced because of the presence of a plausible nonracial excuse for the ir behavior, so were participants lowin motivation to controlprejudiced re actions assumed to besimilarly unconcerned. However even among that group, the IAT did not predict either self-report measure of prejudice. It may be that, even under the most favorable of conditions (e. g., among individuals unmotivated to over ride their implicit attitudes), the IAT will not predict eitherre actions to Blacksor Whites separately but will only predict the difference between The two or an explicitchoice between a Black and a White.
6
Unlike White and Harkins (1994), Petty et al. (1999) left unspecified whether message recipients would be personally by the policydescribedin the persuasive message, so relevance was uncertain.
7
Incidentally, this proposalimplies that primacy effects on recall might beobtained with stigmatized sources. If, for example, a Black source's message begins with weak arguments, the n attention to, and consequent recall of, later arguments might be weaker than for early arguments.
8
Of course, one wonders if successful inhibition of negative implicit racial attitudes will be by subsequent rebound effects, as have been observed with stereotypes (Macrae, Bodenhausen, Milne, & Jetten, 1994).

-58-

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