Diversity in Advertising: Broadening the Scope of Research Directions

By Jerome D. Williams; Wei-Na Lee et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER FOURTEEN
Styleor Substance? Viewers'
Re Actions to Spokesperson's Race in
Advertising
Joan Scattone Spira
Consultant
Tommy E. Whittler
De Paul University

In this new millennium, one may findit difficultto imagine marketersshowing concernabout the race or ethnicity of spokespersons inadvertising. However, mainstream mass-targeted magazines and prime-time television still feature predominantly White models(Green, 1991, 1992; Williams, Qualls, &Grier, 1995; Wilkes & Valencia, 1989). Thus, the of ten-used depiction of America as a “melting pot” may not be accurately portrayedin American advertising. Perhaps some marketers ponder, “Ifwe put minority models inour advertisements, will the y turnoff our White customers? Ifwe do not put minority models inour advertisements, will minority consumersgoelsewhere to purchase similarproducts or services?” These are legitimate concerns given the mounting evidence that various source characteristics mayinfluence an individual's re actions to a persuasive message. For instance, sources that are perceived as more attractive, credible, and similar to the message recipient aremore persuasive than the ir counter parts in delivering the same message (for a review, see Eagly &Chaiken, 1993). A spokesperson's race or ethnicityisoften one of hisorher most readily apparent physical traits; thus, itmay likely influence persuasion. In This chapterwe discuss some of the research that has examined individuals'responses to race or ethnicityin persuasive messages. We first discuss what effect a spokesperson's race has on persuasion, and the n we considerindividual difference, environmental, and contextual variables that may influence who is likely to be influenced by the spokesperson's race and when such

-247-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Diversity in Advertising: Broadening the Scope of Research Directions
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 447

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.