The Psychological Foundations of Culture

By Mark Schaller; Christian S. Crandall | Go to book overview

Subject Index

A
Abstraction, 241–242
Acculturation, 305, 307, 317, 321, 325–327
Acculturation Attitudes Scale, 322
Adaptive explanations, 300
Affective primacy, 351
Aggression
beliefs about self and others, 287, 288
cultural lag, 281, 282
cultural norms, 281–301
cultural resistance and change, 295–298
descriptive norms and expectations, 291, 294
four-stage transition model, 282– 284
in school, 293, 294
norm enforcement, 291–293
norms supporting, 286, 287, 290, 291
North/South regional differences, 284–291
perceived self/other discrepancies, 288–290
persistence of outmoded norms, 282
retaliation, 283–291
Southern code of honor, 284–286, 290
Agriculture, 27, 28
Androgyny
see Gender stereotypes, Stereotype violations
Anthropological frame of inquiry, 5
Aretaic reasoning, 128
Asian-Americans, 311, 318
Attractors, 180
basin of, 180
in social poker games, 190–194
layout of, 195
Authority ranking
see Relational models
Autocracy
autocratic, 112
Autokinetic effect, 184, 185
Automaticity, 353, 354

B
Band, 173, 174, 181–183
structure of, 181
Beliefs
epidemiology of, 149, 150
Belonging
need for, 176
Bias against novelty, 213

C
Canadians, 316, 317, 321, 323, 324
Categorical identifiability, 8
Cheater detection, 176
Closure
autocracy, autocratic, 112, 113
between cultures, 110, 111
collectivism, collectivist, 112, 115, 116, 118
conservatism, conservative, 112, 113
cross-cultural differences, 109, 110

-377-

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