Sports Marketing and the Psychology of Marketing Communication

By Lynn R. Kahle; Chris Riley | Go to book overview

4
Risky Sports: Making the Leap
Aviv Shoham
University of Haifa
Gregory M. Rose
University of Washington, Tacoma
Lynn R. Kahle
University of Oregon

High-risk sports have become popular (Celsi, Rose, & Leigh, 1993). Whereas many leisure activities entail low levels of personal risk, risky sports (such as parachuting and skydiving) are riskier than most leisure sports because the probability of a serious injury (or even death) is higher. Which individuals are psychologically predisposed to engage in risky sports? Once they begin to practice, how best can their continuous practice be anticipated? For marketers, how should service providers segment the population? How should they identify individuals highly pre-disposed to engage in risky sports? How should they advertise to such individuals? Such questions have been the topic of a multi-stage, programmatic study, conducted in Israel over 4 years. This chapter was written in an effort to describe, summarize, and synthesize the results of this research stream.

Marketing scholars have studied risky sports with an academic interest that parallels the popularization of such sports (Celsi, 1992; Price, Arnould, & Tierney, 1995). Two recent articles discuss risky sports from an experiential perspective in the contexts of rafting (Arnould & Price, 1993) and skydiving (Celsi et al., 1993). These studies have resulted in a well-developed understanding of the hedonic aspects of consumption of risky sports. In contrast, Shoham and associates have been involved in a programmatic effort to study

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